Making Bolster cushion for your home interiors – Tips and guidance for the interior designing and decoration

 MAKING CUSHIONS BOLSTER CUSHION

Before cutting the fabric, decide whether any pattern should run along or around the cushion. Cut a rectangle of fabric long enough to wrap around the bolster pad, with 12 mm seam allowance down all sides. Make the rectangle into a tube to fit around the pad, setting a zip into the seam. Fit on to the pad wrong side out, and clip into the seam allowance. Cut a circle of fabric for each end of the cushion, including the same seam allowance.

Apply piping or frills around the edge if required. Fit the circles on to either end of the tube, wrong side out, and tack along the seam line. Remove the cover from the pad and machine stitch seams. Layer and notch seam allowances and press towards the circles. Press, and then turn right side out and press again before inserting the cushion pad. You can decorate the end of bolsters with tassels, rosettes, covered buttons etc. Fit the outer back panel to the back of the chair in the same way, and pin and mark the seam line around the top and sides of the back of the chair. Remove the cover and pins and apply piping to the scam line around the back of the chair. Tack the scam, then stitch, leaving an opening down one side edge 

Draw a scale plan and work out a cutting layout for the panels of fabric, checking that the grain runs up and down the chair, and from front to back across the seat. Then calculate how much fabric you will need from the scale plan. Cut out rectangular panels for the back, outer back and seat of the chair to the appropriate measurements. Mark the center of the back panel, seat panel and chair with lines of pins. Pin the back panel on the chair, wrong side out, matching the pinned lines. Fit it around the top of the chair with stitched darts or tucks if necessary.

 SCATTER CUSHION

Cut out the top cushion piece from fabric, allowing 12 mm seam allowance all round, and make a paper template from it. Cut the paper across where the zip is to be inserted (about J third of the way down), and spread the pieces 2.5 cm apart to allow for the zip. Make a template of this shape and use it to cut the fabric piece for the back. Insert the zip. Apply any decorative trims to the front panel of the cushion. Position the piping or a frill around one cushion piece if required, raw edges together, the piping or frill facing the center of the cushion piece. Tack and stitch in place.

 if necessary to fit the cover. Pin and fit the scat panel in the same way.

Stitch the seams, inserting piping, if required. Fit the back of the cover and the scat on the chair again and tack the scam between the two. Stitch the tacked scams. If there is a crack between the upholstered back and the scat of the chair, shape the scam line so you can tuck in the flap. 

For a gathered skirt, cut the fabric to twice the length of the edge the skirt is to be joined to and join the fabric to make a long strip, allowing 10 cm (4 in) for the hem, a 12 mm seam allowance along the top edge, and a 2.5 cm (1 in) allowance at the ends of the strip for finishing. Press under the turning allowance at the ends; press under a 2.5 cm (1 in) turning along the lower edge, then turn up and stitch an 8cm(3 in) hem along the lower edge.

Gather the raw edge and fit the skirt around the edge of the scat and stitch in place, neatening seam allowances together. Set a zip into the opening at the back corner.

Making headed curtains for windows and doors in interior designing and decoration

 MAKING HEADED CURTAINS Turn the curtain right side out and press, so that the curtain fabric turns to the back of the curtain for 2cm(i in) down each side edge. Turn over the allowance at the top of the curtain (the same width as the heading tape you are using), mitering corners and trimming excess fabric. Turn under the end of the heading tape and position it across the top of the curtain so that all raw edges are covered. Topstitch in place.
Double stitch over the ends of the drawstring tape to hold cords firmly. 3 Pleat up the tape, insert hooks, and hang the curtains to check the length. Pin the hem in place after the fabric has dropped, and stitch by hand or machine. For slotted tapes, pleated with hooks, calculate the fullness required according to the size of each pleat and the spacing between them. Make up the curtain in the same way.
To add a traditional trim down the leading edge of the curtain, topstitch or slip stitch bullion fringe to the finished curtain. For a frill, adjust the seam allowance down the side hem at the leading edge of the curtain and lining to 2 cm U in). Make up a frill and insert it between the fabric and lining. For a bound edge, omit the seam allowance from the curtain down the leading edge. After joining the fabric to the lining down the outer edge, press.
Tack the free side edge of the curtain to the lining. Bind the edges together with a wide strip of coordinating fabric. All curtains hang better if you insert weights inside the hem.
WINDOW DRESSING MAKING TIE-BACKS
Tie-backs, to sweep curtains to the side of the window or to hold back bed drapes, may be made in a number of ways. Two of the most popular styles are shaped tic-backs with bound or piped edges, and straight, frilled tie-backs. For either type, hang the curtains and use a tape measure to judge the best proportions and position for the tic-backs. 
For shaped tie- backs, you will need a panel of the main fabric slightly larger all round than the finished tie- back, stiff buckram the same size as the finished tie-back, enough fabric to bind or pipe the edges, and lining fabric to back the tic-backs.
The frilled bands are made up from strips of fabric slightly longer and just over twice the width of the finished bands, interfacing to stiffen each band, and enough matching or contrasting fabric to make up a frill to the required depth.
SHAPED PIPED TIE-BACKS
Measure up and decide on a shape for the tie- back. Cut out a paper pattern and hold it in place to check the effect. For each tie-back, cut out fabric and lining 12 mm (! in) larger all round than the pattern, a piece of interlining (if required) and a piece of buckram the same size as the pattern. You will also need sufficient piping (  200) to fit around the scam line, lock stitch the interlining to the main fabric, leaving the seam allowance free. Lay the stiffening on the wrong side of the fabric, and stitch around the edge using her- ringbone stitch to hold the buckram in place. Position the piping around the right side of the fabric and pin in place, then stitch on the seam line using a zipper foot.

Press the raw edges of binding and fabric over the edge of the stiffening. Turn under and press seam allowances all around the lining. 
Slips stitch the folded edge of the lining to the seam allowance of the piping. Sew a curtain ring to each end of the tie-back, close to the sea m line or a centimeter or so inside it. Hang the rings over a hook fitted to the side of the window. With larger, decorative knobs, you can use fabric loops to hold the tie-backs in place. 

Making Blinds in a new way- Tips for interior designing and decoration

Make up a length of piping the width of the finished blind, and cut enough fabric to make a frill at least 10 times that measurement. With right sides of fabric and lining together, and the top of the lining 2 cm lower than the top of the fabric, stitch down the side edges. Press seam allowances towards the lining. Stitch the piping to the lower edge of blind, leaving turning free. Make up and gather a frill to fit the lower edge of the blind, distributing fullness evenly. Pin the frill in place over the piping, then pin the lining over the frill and stitch through all layers of fabric.

 Turn blind right side out. Press, Position the tapes down the back of the blind, spacing them about 60 cm (24 in) apart. Turn over 2 cm at the top of the blind, trimming excess fabric from corners and miter them. Position the heading tape, covering the top of the vertical tapes. Stitch all tapes in place. Run cords through the loops in the tape as for Roman blinds. You may want to hang the blind first (according track used) so that you estimate the amount of cord needed for cord running through the cleat which will need to be longer than the, cleat, for example. The cord together tied to the cleat, Curtain part way up so that it.

 ED-BLINDS 

Position the tapes down the back of the blind. Pacing them about 60 cm(24 in) apart. Turn over 2 cm at the top of the blind, trimming excess fabric from comers and mitring them. Position the heading tape, covering the top of the vertical tape. Pitch all tapes in place. Run cords through he loops in the tape as for Roman blind pa e 119). You may want to hang the blind first (according to the type of track used) so that you estimate correctly the amount of cord needed for each length. 

The cord running through the row of loops furthest from the cleat which will hold the cords will need to be longer than the cord nearest the cleat, for example. The cords are all pulled together and tied to the cleat to hold the curtain part way up so that it hangs in swags.

Scatter Cushion and Box Cushion for your Interiors – tips and guidance for Home makeover

AN ARM LESS CHAIR COVER Draw a scale plan and work out a cutting layout for the panels of fabric, checking that the grain runs up and down the chair, and from front to back across the seat. Then calculate how much fabric you will need from the scale plan. Cut out rectangular panels for the back, outer back and seat of the chair to the appropriate measurements. Mark the center of the back panel, seat panel and chair with lines of pins. Pin the back panel on the chair, wrong side out, matching the pinned lines. Fit it around the top of the chair with stitched darts or tucks if necessary.

 SCATTER CUSHION

Cut out the top cushion piece from fabric, allowing 12 mm seam allowance all round, and make a paper template from it. Cut the paper across where the zip is to be inserted (about J third of the way down), and spread the pieces 2.5 cm apart to allow for the zip. Make a template of this shape and use it to cut the fabric piece for the back. Insert the zip. Apply any decorative trims to the front panel of the cushion. Position the piping or a frill around one cushion piece if required, raw edges together, the piping or frill facing the center of the cushion piece. Tack and stitch in place.

Box CUSHION

Cut out a fabric panel for the top of the cushion, making a turn pleat, if necessary. Include a 12 cm seam allowance. For the back, cut two panels of fabric to fit the cushion allowing 2.5 cm extra for the zip to be inserted across the panel. Make up a welt to fit tightly around the cushion pad. Clip into the seam allowances at the corners. If the cushion is round or awkwardly shaped, cut the welt on the bias to make it easier to fit. Fit piping at around the upper and lower panels if required. With right sides facing inwards, fit the top and base panel to the welt and pin. If the cushion is to be tied in place, make up fabric ties and pin them into the seams at the back corners.

 Remove the pinned cover by opening the zip and machine stitch the seams. Clip seam allowance across the corners and notch curved seams as necessary. The zip can be inserted into the welt in which case measure up for two lengths of fabric to make up the welt, one that extends around adjoining corners by 5 cm both ways. This piece needs to be 2.5 cm wider than the other welt piece so that it can be split down its length to insert the zip. With the zip open, right sides facing and raw edges matching, sew around the cushion. Turn right side out. Press before inserting the cushion.

RE-COVERING A DROP-IN SEAT-REPAIRING AN OVER-STUFFED SEAT-Interior Tips and guidance

RE-COVERING A DROP-IN SEAT

Cut a panel of calico, allowing at least 20 cm (8 in) all round to wrap around the sides and under the seat. Layout the fabric, wrong side up, and center the chair seat on the panel. Wrap the fabric around the drop-in seat, tightening it over the front and back rails first. Knock in temporary tacks at the center front and back, then wrap the fabric tightly around the sides and use tracks at the center of each side. Nail the fabric down each side of the underside of the seat, spacing the tacks about 5 cm apart, to within 5-10 cm of each corner. Wrap the corner of the panel of fabric over the frame and tack in place, close to the corner of the seat.

Make an inverted pleat around the corner so that you can wrap the side turnings together to form a neat mitre. Tack in place. Repeat to fit the fabric outer cover, positioning motifs centrally if the fabric has a bold pattern. Trim away excess fabric. Cut a piece of canvas or black linen upholstery fabric to the size of the underside of the seat, adding 12 mm (! in) all round. Turn under and press 4 cm (1! in) turnings all around the canvas and tack them in place underneath the seat to cover the ra wedge of the seat fabric.

REPAIRING AN OVER-STUFFED SEAT 

Strip off the old covering and webbing, noting how it was constructed and reserving stuffing and padding for re-use if possible. Use a tack lifter to lever out tacks. Traditional seats have a basket work of webbing across the base of the seat. Do not cut webbing to length: position the end of the first strip to be fixed with the raw edge level with the inside of the frame of the chair and fix in place with three tacks, close to the outer edge of the rail. Fold the webbing back over the end, and fix with two more tacks inside the first three. Use a webbing stretcher or wooden block to stretch the webbing across the seat, and hold in place with three tacks, close to the outer edge of the fixing rail. Trim the webbing 4cm from the tacks and fold over and fix the end with two more tacks inside the previous three. Repeat for all the strips of webbing. 

The gap between the webbing strips should be less than the width of the webbing. Work from front to back across the chair, and then weave the crosswise webbing over and under the first strips as you work.

Cut a piece of canvas for the lining, allowing a 2.5cm turning all around. Stretch the canvas across the frame, with the grain running parallel to the front and back rails. Hold in place with temporary tacks at the sides and corners and when you are happy with the fit, knock in the tacks. Turn in the allowance and tack in place every 5cm or so all around the chair. 3 Make a series of large back stitches (known as bridle ties) around the edge of the canvas. Tease out horsehair and arrange it on the seat, tucking it under the loops around the edge. Build up the center of the seat and ensure that the frame is well padded.

Fit calico over the seat, fixing it firmly along the straight back edge of the seat first, then stretching it to the front and then the sides of the chair. Hold it taut with temporary tacks as you work. Around the legs, cut into the fabric at the corners, and wrap it firmly around the seat, without straining it at the corners. Tuck in the fullness at the front corners and turn under the fabric in line with the top of the leg before tacking in place. 

Trim away fabric close to the tacks. 5 Lay a padding of cotton wadding or v interlining over the calico so that it w over the edge of the frame. Trim excess fabric corners.

Fit the cover in the same way as calico: the top cover may be held in place’ brass upholstery tacks, closely spaced, or ‘ ordinary tacks. Some styles have to be f along the outer edge of the side and front J others can be fixed under the frame of the 6 Glue a plain woven or decorative 1 trim to the edge of the upholstery to any tacks that show and make a neat between the frame of the chair and the fa Fit a base of canvas or calico for a neat finish.

Fit calico over the seat, fixing it firmly along the straight back edge of the seat first, and then stretching it to the front and then the sides of the chair. Hold it taut with temporary tacks as you work. Around the legs, cut into the fabric at the corners, and wrap it firmly around the seat, without straining it at the corners. Tuck in the fullness at the front corners and turn under the fabric in line with the top of the leg before tacking in place. Trim away fabric close to the tacks. 

Making Australian Blinds – Interior designing and decoration Window dressing with blinds

MAKING BLINDS

BLIND ROMAN BLINDS

Cut the main fabric and lining to the size of the finished blind, plus 5cm heading allowance. If you want a decorative border, perhaps in a plain color if the curtain fabric is patterned, make up a strip of straight- or bias- cut binding, long enough to bind the sides and lower edge of the blind. You will also need a length of fine wooden doweling for each fold of the blind, the same width as the finished blind, and curtain rings and cords to draw the blind up. Space the cords up to 60 cm apart, and buy enough curtain rings to hold each cord to each dowel casing. 

Turn under and press a 1 cm turning down each long edge of binding, and fold the binding in half. Position the blinding around the sides and lower edge of the main fabric with right sides together and the raw edge of the binding 4cm from the edge of the fabric. Stitch in place, leaving an allowance for mitering at the corners. Press bindings away from the blind. Position the lining on the main fabric, wrong sides facing. Mark and stitch casings through both layers of fabric across the blind, spacing them evenly up the blind. 

The lowest casing should be the depth of the fold plus the j 3 4 border from the finished edge of the blind. Stitch from one folded edge of the binding to the other. Then slip the dowels into the casings and fold the binding over the edge of both layers of fabric. Slip stitch is the free folded edge to the lining, enclosing the end of the dowel and forming neat miter at the corners. Stitch rings to the back of each casing, at the point where the cords cross them, and fit the blind as before. 
WINDOW DRESSING MAKING GATHERED BLINDS

Austrian blinds borrow many of their construction details from curtains. Special tracks are available, together with tapes and cords in kit form. The blind is drawn up in the same way as a Roman blind. Since the heading is gathered, the width measurement of the fabric is not critical, bur allow plenty of fullness for an extravagant effect. Lining add luxury, and a piped frill gives a delicate finish. Festoon blinds are usually unlined and may be made with similar kits, but the blind shown here is a variation on a more traditional method. Ribbon or decorative cord is threaded through casings in the blind to gather it up, with the usual cords held by rings at the back of the blind.

LINED AUSTRIAN BLINDS For a lined Austrian blind, allow at least 10 times fullness for both fabric and lining. Cut the main fabric, so that it is at least 4cm wider than the lining. If you have to join two widths of fabric, cut one width in half length ways and join the shelve edges to the main panel of fabric to avoid positioning a seam down the center of the blind. The length of fabric for the blind should be the length of the finished blind plus 12 mm seam allowance at the lower edge and 2 cm at the top edge. Cut the lining fabric 2 cm shorter than the main fabric. 

Making Curtains in Interior designing and decoration – How to make a headed curtain?

LINED CURTAINS WITH HEADING TAPES
It is not essential to line curtains, but linings do make them more efficient, keeping out the light on bright summer days and keeping in the heat on cold winter evenings. Purpose- designed lining fabrics are available in tightly woven cotton or blended fibers, in a range of colors to suit most needs. You can use coordinating furnishing fabrics for curtain linings, plain glazed cotton with floral prints, formal satin stripes with rich velvet or combinations of printed fabric of the same weight. Always check the effect of the fabric and lining together before buying by draping a length of both fabrics together while they are still on the roll. Ensure that they hang well and that no color or pattern shows through the main fabric.
 To make curtains even more effective, both in the way they insulate the window and in the way they drape, interlining can be used be- tween the curtain fabric and the lining. Thick, soft fabric (usually bump or domette) is held against the curtain fabric with tiny, loose stitches.  Join fabric widths for curtain and lining, so that the lining panel is 8 cm (3 in) narrower and up to 15 cm (6 in) shorter than the main fabric, Turn under a 4cm double hem across the lower edge of lining. Lay out the fabric, right side up, and position the lining on top of it, so that the raw edge at the top of the lining is below the raw edge, at the top of the curtain. Adjust the fabric so that you can pin the side edges of the curtain and lining together. Stitch together, taking 2 cm (4 in) wide seams.
Press seam allowances towards lining.
MAKING HEADED
Turn the curtain right side of, so that the curtain fabric turn off the curtain for 2 cm (5 in) dough edge. Turn over the allowance at the curtain (the same width as the h you are using), mitering corners an excess fabric. Turn under the heading tape and position it across the curtain so that all raw edges a Topstitch in place. Double stitch 0 of the drawstring tape to hold core 3 Pleat up the tape, insert hook the curtains to check the long hem in place after the fabric has the stitch by hand or machine.
 For slotted tapes pleated ‘A’ calculate the fullness required the size of each pleat and the spacing them.
Make up the curtain in the s; To add a traditional trim leading edge of the curtain, to slip stitch bullion fringe to the finish For a frill, adjust the seam allow and side hem at the leading edge of the lining to 2 cm (5in). Make up a frill and insert it between the fabric and for a bound edge, omit the allowance from the curtain down I edge, after joining the fabric to down the outer edge, press. Tack t edge of the curtain to the lining edges together with a wide coordinating fabric. All curtains hang better if weights inside the hem.
Check the effect of the fabric and lining before buying by draping a length of fabrics together while they are still on the ensure that they hang well and that no or pattern shows through the main make curtains even more effective, both way they insulate the window and in the drape, interlining can be used be- ‘he curtain fabric and the lining.

Thick, ric (usually bump or domette) is held the curtain fabric with tiny, loose. fabric widths for curtain and lining, hat the lining panel is 8 cm (3 in) r and up to 15 cm (6 in) shorter than fabric. Turn under a 4 cm (1    in)cmacross the lower edge of the lining. ‘.he fabric, right side up, and position on top of it, so that the raw edge at ,- the lining is 10cm(4 in) below the at the top of the curtain. Adjust the at you can pin the side edges of the d lining together. Stitch together, m wide scams. Press seam towards the lining.

Covering Fabrics for the furniture in Interior designing and decoration – Tips and guidance

COVERING FABRICS

It is essential to use firmly the upholstery; it must hold it: stretched and not allow tack through the weave. Velvet and fabric, brocade and silk, dhow linen, and plain or woven pat can all be used for upholstery, use the upholstery has to no-decorated scheme of the two important considerations in the FAB. The two dining chair seats illustrate some of the prime upholstery. The method for coin seat shows how calico attached, and can be adapted if is fixed directly to the frame of The overstuffed chair seat unique a step further, showing I the webbing and re-fit the pad, finishing the cover.

The met drop-in seats, and upholstery I on the back or the arms of a chair the chair dictates where the fixed: it may be fitted in an area of the chair, with a carved or s trim; or it may wrap around chair, so that trimming is del than acting as a mask for tack h Always cut the panels of the crosswise grain runs parallel to back rails, with the lengthwise down the center of the chair tacking is a professional tech upholstery which involves with a few strategically spa you fit the permanent tacks.  

Use upholstery tacks and a fine ham- to fix the webbing, canvas and calico in e. The horsehair is held in place with large, e stitches (bridle ties); you will need a ‘y, straight or curved upholstery needle to this. A finer curved needle is useful for stitching fabric in place – both the calico or and the top cover of the chair.

It is essential to use firmly woven fabrics for upholstery; it must hold its shape when stretched and not allow tack heads to slip through the weave. Velvet and heavy tapestry fabric, brocade and silk, dobby weave and linen, and plain or woven patterned cottons can all be used for upholstery. The amount of use the upholstery has to undergo and the decorative scheme of the room are other important considerations in choosing a fabric. The two dining chair seats discussed here illustrate some of the principles of simple upholstery. The method for covering a drop- in seat shows how calico and cover are attached, and can be adapted if the upholstery is fixed directly to the frame of the chair.

 The overstuffed chair seat takes the technique a step further, showing how to replace the webbing and re-fit the padding, as well as finishing the cover. The methods apply to drop-in seats, and upholstery fitted to panels on the back or the arms of a chair. The style of the chair dictates where the fabric should be fixed: it may be fitted in a recess on the frame of the chair, with a carved or shaped wooden trim; or it may wrap around the seat of the chair, so that trimming is decorative rather than acting as a mask for tack heads. 

Always cut the panels of fabric so that the crosswise grain runs parallel to the front and back rails, with the lengthwise grain running down the center of the chair. Temporary tacking is a professional technique used in upholstery which involves holding the fabric taut with a few strategically spaced tacks while you fit the permanent tacks.

Curtains for interior designing how to use the new and old curtains for windows and doors- tips and guidance

JOINING FABRIC
 The first step in making cut fabric widths
Use only full and fabric, Always make sure t matches across the complete Slip-tacking (  196) is use which are difficult to match widths (if required) at the out curtain. Use flat seams for cu lining, and clip into selvage: seams from puckering.
MAKING UNLINED
 After joining fabric width seams, turn u wide double hems down eac the panel of fabric for each CD or hem in place.
FADED CURTAINS
  Top wide unlined curtains need, availing  or on a ‘heck the help -hey ht. 11 e plus 2cm(it in) turning at the top and 10cm(4 in) for the hem. Include an allowance (the length of the pattern repeat) for pattern matching. Multiply by the number of drops of fabric required. For lined curtains, allow fullness according to the type of tape you are using.
Allow 4 cm (1 in) side hems when calculating the number of drops of fabric. Include a turning allowance of 8 cm (3 in) – the depth of the heading tape- and a hem allowance of 10 cm (4 in). Include any allowance for pattern matching. Since lining fabric is generally slightly narrower than curtain fabric, it is usually fairly simple to calculate the amount needed.
Allow the same amount of fullness for the total width of the curtain, but there is no need to include an allowance for side turnings. No allowance is needed at the top of the curtain, and only 6 cm (2in) for hems. The amount of curtain tape for each curtain is the same as the finished (un-gathered or un-pleated) width, plus a few centimeters for turning under at each end.
JOINING FABRIC WIDTHS
The first step in making curtains is to join fabric widths, Use only full and half-widths of fabric. Always make sure that the pattern matches across the complete set of curtains. Slip-tacking is useful for patterns which are difficult to match. Position half-widths (if required) at the outer edge of each curtain. Use flat seams for curtain fabric and lining, and clip into selvedges to prevent the seams from puckering.
 MAKING UNLINED CURTAINS
After joining fabric widths with flat fell seams, turn under 2cm (1 in) wide double hems down each outer edge of the panel of fabric for each curtain. Topstitch or hem in place. 7. 8. 2 At the top, make sure that the fabric edge is straight; turn over a 2 cm (i in) wide turning, mitering corners and trimming away excess fabric if necessary. Cut heading tape to length, turning under 1 cm (i in) at each end, and pin it in place across the top of the curtain 1 cm (i in) from the top fold, so the raw edge is covered.
Pin, then topstitch, making extra lines of stitching across the tape ends to hold the drawstrings firmly. 3 Turn up 2 cm (1 in), and then 8 cm (3 in) across the lower edge of the curtain and slip stitch in place, or use a machine hemming stitch. Use drawstrings to gather the curtains, tying the cords firmly near the center of the curtain. Fit hooks into the woven loops and hang the curtains. If the curtains are to fit inside a window recess, the length has to be precise, therefore, gather and hang the curtains before hemming. This is also advisable with loosely woven fabrics which may ‘drop’ – leave them for at least 24 hours before hemming.

Unlined curtains can be backed if you make up the separate lining and fit a special lining tape. This requires no extra allowance along the top edge of the lining. The lining fabric slips between the two layers of tape and is machined in place. This method will not how- ever, improve the hang of the curtain. It will provide extra insulation and protect the curtain fabric from strong sunlight and fading, as well as making it easier to wash. The curtain hooks are inserted through the lining tape and then into the curtain heading tape before hanging. The lining and curtain can then be hand-sewn together at intervals down the edges, if necessary.

SOFT FURBISH LOOSE COVERS(SLIPCOVERS- decorate with Furniture loose Covers

SOFT FURBISH LOOSE COVERS (SLIPCOVERS)

Whether you want to change a color scheme or revitalize a favorite chair, loose covers (slipcovers) are the ideal furnishing solution. Their practicality also endears them to areas of heavy use, such as family rooms, where covers that are removable and can be washed or dry- cleaned come into their own. Loose covers (slipcovers) were first made in the eighteenth century as a form of protective covering for fine silk and velvet upholstery. They were frequently made in dimity, a gingham-like cloth, and many paintings of interiors show that their fit was far from tailored. This informal, unfitted style is echoed by the throw over, used for both chairs and sofas – a skillfully draped length of cloth, sometimes an old embroidered or linen tablecloth or antique bedspread, well tucked in down the sides and around cushions, but neither cut nor sewn. 

A few darts can be added for shape and to keep it in place, but when piled high with cushions, a throw over suggests casual informality. A tailored loose cover (slipcover), with matching or contrasting piping to outline the shape of the chair or sofa and a straight valance, with inverted pleats at the corners, will lend a neat, formal look that is almost indistinguishable from an upholstered piece. But the loose cover (slipcover) is most often associated with a more mellow formality, with chintz and linen covers in classic floral patterns that age gracefully. Gathered valances and plump cushions add to the sense of ease and comfort.

 Choosing fabric

The right quality fabric will help to achieve a good-looking finish. It must be strong, but also light enough to take decorative piping and a well- pressed seam line, so avoid materials such as velvet, tapestry or tweed because of their bulk. Woven and printed cotton and glazed chintz are ideal for light occasional use but try a more durable fabric such as a heavy cotton weave or linen union for hardware. If you’re chosen fabric is not shrink resistant, and covers are to be washed rather than dry-cleaned, pre-wash all materials, including piping, before making up. Start with a plain fabric or a print with a small all-over pattern, which is easier to match or position than fabrics with large designs and bold motifs. These should be centered on covers.

 SOFT FURNISHINGS MAKING LOOSE COVERS (SLIPCOVERS)

 Tailored or casually fitted covers are a practical and traditional finish for upholstered furniture. You can add a range of different trims to set the style of the cover, picking up themes used elsewhere in the room. The simplest finish is a drawstring casing around the lower edge of the chair, with a tape threaded through it to draw the edge of the cover under the chair. Skirts and fringed trims can be added according to the effect you want. Piping emphasizes the structure of a piece of furniture and adds formality. It can be combined with a skirt with inverted pleats at the corners to give a tailored finish. Deep bullion fringing can also be stitched around the lower edge of the cover to hide unsightly legs.

 Loose covers (slipcovers) are not difficult to make but they are bulky and awkward to handle. Tackle simple shapes first – an arm less chair is a suitable project for a beginner. The basic method involves cutting rectangles of fabric to cover the chair or sofa, and then constructing the cover on the chair with the fabric inside out. By fitting the panels inside out, it is easy to mark and tack seam lines. Fit and stitch the various sections of the cover in turn, following the sequence described here.