Sofa – Cushion Covers and Window curtain fabric stitching and pleats design in interior design and decoration tips and guidance

For the stitching lines of each tuck into the fabric, following to wide pleats, fold the fabric so stitching lines come together. Stitch each tuck in turn, t foot of the machine or t markings as a guide when stitching. There is no need to the threads as they will be hems. Trim the fabric to tl ensuring the tucks are position medium length and width zigzag stitch and fit the cording foot on the machine. (This has a hole to guide the cording thread under the needle.) 

Mark the position of the cording with chalk or a line of tacking threads on the right side of the fabric. Thread the end of the cord into the foot and position the edge of the work under the foot of the machine. Stitch along the marked line, feeding the cord under the foot, so that the zigzag stitch holds the cord in place. Two parallel lines of cording, 6 mm (i in) apart, are a simple, effective touch.

TUCKING Decide on a suitable width and spacing for the rucks: they may be stitched close to the folded edge of the fabric for a very narrow ruck (pin rucks), or up to about 15 mm from the fold for a wider tuck. Calculate the total number of tucks and allow twice the width of each tuck when working out how much fabric you will need. 

Add an extra allowance so that you can trim the panel accurately when making up the item. Mark out the rucks across the top and lower edge of the area to be stitched. With large areas, such as a duvet cover, mark across the center of the fabric as well. For pin rucks, mark the center of each pleat.
For wider rucks, mark the stitching lines of each tuck. Press the pleats into the fabric, following the marks. With wide pleats, fold the fabric so that the marked stitching lines come together. Stitch each tuck in turn, using the presser foot of the machine or the throat plate markings as a guide when positioning the stitching.

 There is no need to finish the ends of the threads as they will be enclosed in seams or hems. Trim the fabric to the required size, ensuring the rucks are positioned centrally.

A DUVET COVER 1 Measure the duvet to be covered and cut out two panels of fabric, allowing 5 cm for seams and ease all round. Decorate the top panel of fabric before trimming to size. If you have to join widths of a patterned fabric for the top panel, position a full width down the center of the cover and strips of equal size down either side. Join widths with a flat fell seam, slip-tacking first if there is a difficult pattern match. 

Join the two panels of fabric using a French seam. Across the lower edge of the cover, end the seams 20 cm in from each corner to make an opening for inserting the duvet. Press the folds of the seam allowance across the opening to provide the hem. Turn the cover inside out again. Across the opening, position the popper tape (or whatever fastening you wish to use to contain the duvet – Velcro strips, press studs, buttons etc. and cover or hem the raw edges. 

Ensure that the opposite halves of the opening match and secure the fastening in place. Turn right side out and press. 

Making Pillow covers in interior designing and decoration – Tips and guidance

A PLAIN PILLOWCASE

 Cut out a strip of fabric, twice the length of the pillow plus a total of 30 cm (12 in) for turnings and tuck in. Allow 2 cm (l in) seam allowance down each long edge. At the tuck-in end, turn under and press 15 mm and then 10cm to make a broad border. Stitch in place and add cording or any other trim if required. At the tuck-in end, turn under and press a 15 mm double hem.

PILLOWCASE WITH BORDER For a crisp, flat edging to a pillowcase, the front should be cut from one panel of fabric and the back cut from two panels, one to cover the main part of the pillow and the other to form a tuck-in. Cut out the front panel, allowing 6cm – or whatever width you want- all around for the border and seam allowance. Cut out the main back panel, omitting the border allowance down one short edge. Cut the tuck-in panel the same width as the main panel and 23 cm deep. Turn under a 2cm double hem down the short edge of the main back panel and on the smaller back panel.

If you want a more traditional fastening, make buttonholes along the hemmed edge of the main back panel. Position the main panel over the tuck-in, with the wrong side of the main panel facing the right side of the back panel so that they make up a panel the same size as the front panel of fabric. Tack together within the seam allowance where the panels overlap. Position the back on the front, right sides facing, and pin together all around the outer edge.

Stitch, taking a 1 cm seam allowance

 Stitch in place by machine and press a 15cm wide n 2 Fold the fabric in half so 1 edge of the border match: tuck-in, wrong sides together down each long edge, taking seam. Trim seams, press and Complete the French seam, t seam allowance as before.

Turn right side out and I all around the pillowcase, stitching 5 cm (2 in) inside the line to make a flat border. P trimming along the seam line sews on buttons or other fastening

Making Seat covers and pleats – Interior designing and decoration tips and guidelines

The center of each pleat

 For the stitching lines of each tuck into the fabric, following tl wide pleats, fold the fabric so stitching lines come together. Stitch each tuck in turn, t foot of the machine or t markings as a guide when stitching. There is no need to the threads as they will be hems. Trim the fabric to tl ensuring the tucks are position medium length and width zigzag stitch and fit the cording foot on the machine. (This has a hole to guide the cording thread under the needle.) Mark the position of the cording with chalk or a line of tacking threads on the right side of the fabric. Thread the end of the cord into the foot and position the edge of the work under the foot of the machine. Stitch along the marked line, feeding the cord under the foot, so that the zigzag stitch holds the cord in place. Two parallel lines of cording, 6 mm (i in) apart, are a simple, effective touch.

TUCKING Decide on a suitable width and spacing for the rucks: they may be stitched close to the folded edge of the fabric for a very narrow ruck (pin rucks), or up to about 15 mm from the fold for a wider tuck. Calculate the total number of tucks and allow twice the width of each tuck when working out how much fabric you will need. Add an extra allowance so that you can trim the panel accurately when making up the item. Mark out the rucks across the top and lower edge of the area to be stitched. With large areas, such as a duvet cover, mark across the center of the fabric as well. For pin rucks, mark the center of each pleat.

For wider rucks, mark the stitching lines of each tuck. Press the pleats into the fabric, following the marks. With wide pleats, fold the fabric so that the marked stitching lines come together. Stitch each tuck in turn, using the presser foot of the machine or the throat plate markings as a guide when positioning the stitching. There is no need to finish the ends of the threads as they will be enclosed in seams or hems. Trim the fabric to the required size, ensuring the rucks are positioned centrally.

A DUVET COVER 1 Measure the duvet to be covered and cut out two panels of fabric, allowing 5cm for seams and ease all round. Decorate the top panel of fabric before trimming to size. If you have to join widths of a patterned fabric for the top panel, position a full width down the center of the cover and strips of equal size down either side. Join widths with a flat fell seam, slip-tacking first if there is a difficult pattern match. Join the two panels of fabric using a French seam. 

Across the lower edge of the cover, end the seams 20cm in from each corner to make an opening for inserting the duvet. Press the folds of the seam allowance across the opening to provide the hem. 2 Turn the cover inside out again. Across the opening, position the popper tape (or whatever fastening you wish to use to contain the duvet – Velcro strips, press studs, buttons etc. and cover or hem the raw edges. Ensure that the opposite halves of the opening match and secure the fastening in place. Turn right side out and press. 

SEWING TECHNIQUES- INTERLINED CURTAINS-FINISHES & TRIMMINGS – Interior designing and decoration tips on SEWING

SEWING TECHNIQUES

 INTERLINED CURTAINS

For extra weight, lined curtains may be interlined. For interlining, you will need a panel of fabric for each curtain, the same size as the finished (ungathered) curtain, or slightly longer if you want to pad the hems for a fuller look.

Calculate the total quantity by dividing the total width of the curtain by the width of the interlining fabric, and multiplying the number of drops required to make up the panel by the finished length of the curtains. Interlining should be joined with a lapped or abutted seam. Join interlining to the curtain fabric with lock stitch (p. 196), so that the interlining is centered on the panel of fabric for the curtain. Treat the curtain fabric and interlining as a single piece of fabric to finish the curtain.

FINISHES & TRIMMINGS

There are many purchased finishes and trimmings used in home sewing. Ribbon, lace and braid are suitable for any seam which is straight but for curved seams and a truly professional finish, use bias-cut fabric.

CUTTING BIAS BINDING

 To find the bias of the fabric, fold it so that the selvedge is parallel with the weft or crosswise grain (1). Press this fold to give yourself the first cutting line. Now cut all the remaining bias strips parallel to this line to the desired width (2). To join strips, position ends together as shown, right sides facing, so that the edges of the strips match at the stitching line (3). Press seam open and trim away points of fabric after stitching.

 MITRING CORNERS To turn up a hem at a corner, you need to mitre the corner. Turn up the hems along both edges of fabric to the same width and press (1). Insert a pin at the edge of the fabric where the two hems intersect and open out again. Fold in the corner diagonally to meet the pins at both sides. Cut across the corner about 6 mm (i in) from the folded edge (2) and turn in the hems again, Slipstitch the corner edges together and finish the other hems with your chosen method (3).

This works with hems of unequal width, for example, on curtains. 

Bed Linen creates a great interiors – interior designing and decoration – Tips and guidance

When making your own bed linen, where possible apply any decorative touches before finishing the seams. Decoration is best limited to borders and edgings (it is uncomfortable to sleep on when used elsewhere). Use full width fabric for the reverse of the duvet and bottom sheet to avoid uncomfortable seams. 

Cording and pin tucks are described here – other finishes are described elsewhere: applique, frills and piping. Sheets and duvet covers should be made up in sheeting width fabric – normally 228 cm wide. If you want to use a print which is not available in sheeting width, just use it for the parts of the bed linen that will show – the borders all around the pillowcase or along the top edge of the duvet, for example.

Choose washable fabrics. Linen is luxurious, but demands time and effort to keep it at its best; cotton or a cotton/polyester mix are more practical alternatives. Where possible, use enclosed seams to prevent fraying during laundering. CORDING Use fine cotton cord, in white or a color to match or contrast with the fabric. Thread the machine with an appropriate color: if you use contrast cording, use a contrast color in the needle; the bobbin thread can be matched to the fabric so that the stitching is less obvious on the underside. Set the sewing machine to a medium length and width zigzag stitch and fit the cording foot on the machine. 

This has a hole to guide the cording thread under the needle.

Mark the position of the cording with chalk or a line of tacking threads on the right side of the fabric. Thread the end of the cord into the foot and position the edge of the work under the foot of the machine. Stitch along the marked line, feeding the cord under the foot, so that the zigzag stitch holds the cord in place. Two parallel lines of cording, 6 mm apart, are a simple, effective touch.


TUCKING Decide on a suitable width and spacing for the tucks: they may be stitched close to the folded edge of the fabric for a very narrow tuck (pin tucks), or up to about 15 mm from the fold for a wider tuck. Calculate the total number of tucks and allow to each tucking when working out} you will need. Add an extra a you can trim the panel a, making up the item. Mark out the tucks across the edge of the area to be stitch areas, such as a duvet cover, center of the fabric as well. 

Coloring the Interiors – concept selection of colors – tips and guidance for Interior designing and decoration

ACCESSORIES CO-ORDINATION & GROUPING

One of the easiest ways to give cohesion to a group of accessories and ornaments is to pick a theme. It may be a color, a subject, or a similar shape, although the things you collect need not necessarily be in the same style or period. Start with a core of items with some connection and keep your choice flexible. A thoughtful, eclectic mixture can reflect truly individual taste; in a collection of jugs, for instance, a few genuine, antique examples will blend in beautifully with new, reproduction jugs of any period.

Color grouping

Grouping ornaments and accessories by their color is a powerful way to highlight a color scheme. You could choose cushions, lampshades and picture frames in antique, muted soft colors that pick up one of the tones in a rug, carpet or wallpaper. Select your colors carefully: coral ceramic vases and lamp bases contrast well in a smoke-blue living room scheme. In a predominately apricot bedroom, accents of soft aquamarine could be introduced – in delicately embroidered cushions and decorative glass.

Collecting ornaments in the same colors, such as blue and white jars, bowls and plates and displaying them against a matching backdrop brings a welcome freshness. Conversely, a collection of brilliant saffron yellow plates on a dresser can make a predominately cool blue and white kitchen scheme feel sunny and Mediterranean. Large blue and white ginger jars were a favorite early-Georgian accessory offering a welcome focal point and light relief to many heavily carved mantelpieces.

 A pair, or group, of blue and white ginger jars can still do the same for traditional mantelpieces, or use them to bring a classical touch to a modern setting. Covering old blanket chests and screens, small card and wooden boxes and metal wastepaper bins in fabrics that either co-ordinate or blend in with the rest of the furnishings helps to link some of the more disparate elements. 

Extra touches Collections and accessories can be witty and tongue-in-cheek. An assortment of necklaces can enhance the necks of plain glass and pottery vases. A trompe l’oeil painted cat on a fire screen with a collection of needlepoint cat cushions makes an amusing point. If you haven’t much wall space on which to hang all your objects, consider displaying them on a freestanding fabric-covered screen – the panels are perfect for pinning up collections of old Valentine cards and dolls’ hats. Antique toy and games collections can be carefully displayed in special Perspex cases to great effect. Medals, coins, stamps, old pieces of lace and fans can be framed in deep box frames 

How to use our own bed linen for Interior designing and decoration – Tips and guidance

BED LINEN 

Wealthy medieval households spun and wove their own bed linen which was stored in huge oak linen presses smelling sweetly of wood ruff and lavender. Bed linen was considered so precious it was included in wedding dowries and wills; rich travelers took their sheets and pillows with them when they went to stay with friends. And while embroidered silk ‘over sheets’ adorned royal beds, practical linen sheets went underneath. Satin sheets were reputed to have made a brief appearance in Tudor times in Britain through the auspices of Anne Boleyn who brought them back from France.

 However, cotton sheets were not introduced until the end of the eighteenth century and remained white throughout the nineteenth century, although the edges were often elaborately embroidered and trimmed with lace and ribbons. It was not until the 1960s that deep- dyed colors and sumptuous floral printed cotton bed linen first appeared; duvets from Germany and Scandinavia were also introduced and revolutionized styles in modern bed linen. 

Styles and fabrics Bed lien should be seen as part of the whole bedroom scheme. Colors, styles and patterns in duvets and pillowcases should match, complement or contrast with other bedroom furnishings such as the curtains, blinds or a bedspread.

It also helps to think of successful combinations: pure, crisp white cotton sheets with delicate lace, scalloped or picot edges always look marvelous against rich mahogany or walnut bedheads and Empire-style beds. Flower-sprigged cotton duvets and valance frills are pretty and practical on a divan in a young girl’s room or a spare bedroom. Sheets and pillowcases patterned with bold cabbage roses can complement a white lace and crochet bedspread or perhaps co-ordinate with a smaller geometric trellis, a striped bedspread and matching curtains or an Austrian blind. 

Sofa beds in a living room, study or one- room apartment could have a set of bed linen that 160 complements the upholstery: midnight-blue sheets and pillowcases with a light quilt in a bold paisley pattern could either match or co-ordinate with the sofa covers. By making your own bed linen, you can add special decorative touches, making it truly individual- details such as tucking and cording in a contrasting color for pillowcase and sheet borders. 

Borders of coordinating fabrics or plain fabrics in a contrasting color also look attractive. A time-honored favorite is to have plain sheets and pillowcases discreetly monogrammed in satin stitch with your initials. A few embroidered flowers, leaves or bows do wonders for a plain white pillowcase corner.  

Kids Bedroom accessories and Interior designing and decoration at home


NURSERY BEDDING & ACCESSORIES deep. Use a single thickness of chintz, or a double thickness of lighter fabric. Cut a panel of fabric for the back panel the size of the finished overall piece. Cut three strips for pockets making the length of each strip the same as the width of the panel, and adding 2.5cm(1 in) across the top for a double hem, and 12 mm (t in) turning across the bottom. 

Cut sufficient binding or bias cut fabric to bind the outer edge of the back panel, and make two loops from fabric or binding to hang the storage pockets from the corner posts of the cot or from two hooks on the back of the door. Turn under a double 12 mm (t in) hem across the top of each pocket strip and stitch. Turn under and press a 12 mm (t in) seam allowance across the lower edge. Position the three strips across the front of the back panel, spacing them evenly apart.

 Tack in place down the sides and across the lower edge. Top stitch in place. Mark the width of each pocket across the strips, and tack down the marked lines. Top stitch in place, reinforcing the end of the stitching at the top of each pocket by sewing a few stitches in reverse, position binding around the outer edge of the front panel, making a pleat at each corner to form a neat mitre. 

Position the ends of the strip for the corner loops between the binding and fabric at each top corner. Stitch in place, enclosing the sides of the pockets and stitching across the end of the loops. Turn binding over to the back of the panel and stitch the folded edge in place by hand or machine.  

 For deeper pockets, allow an extra 2.5 cm (1 in) for each pocket along the length of the strip. Turn and stitch the top hem and press the seam allowance under along the lower edge. Before stitching the strip in position, mark the stitching lines for each pocket and make a 6 mm (;} in) deep tuck on either side of each line. Make similar tucks 2cmG in) from each end of the pocket strip. Tack the tucks in place. Position the strips across the back panel and stitch in place as before, so that the ends of the tucks are held in by the base stitching. Remove tacking and bind the edge. 

Kids Bedroom designing and decoration with kids Items and play things

NURSERY BEDDING & Ac deep. Use a single thickness of double thickness of lighter fabric. Of fabric for the back panel the finished overall piece. Cut the pockets making the length of a same as the width of the panel, 2.5 cm(1 in) across the top for a ( and 12 mm (! in) turning across Cut sufficient binding or bias cut f the outer edge of the back pane. two loops from fabric or binding storage pockets from the corner cot or from two hooks on the back Turn under a double 12 mm across the top of each pocket. Turn under and press a 12 mm allowance across the lower edge, three strips across the front of the spacing them evenly apart. Ta down the sides and across the Top stitch in place.

 Mark the pocket across the strips, and tack marked lines. Top stitch in place, the end of the stitching at the pocket by sewing a few stitches in Position binding around the 01 the front panel, making a pleat at to form a neat miter. Position the strip for the corner loops between and fabric at each top corner. Stitch enclosing the sides of the pockets J across the end of the loops. Turn to the back of the panel and stitch edge in place by hand or machine. 

For deeper pockets, allow an (1 in) for each pocket along the strip. Turn and stitch the top hem: seam allowance under along the before stitching the strip in position stitching lines for each pocket deep tuck on either line. Make similar tucks 2 cm end of the pocket strip. Tack the tucks in place. Position across the back panel and stitch before, so that the ends of the tuck by the base stitching. Remove bind the edge. Turn under 2.5 cm down each long edge of the binding, position on the inner side of the quilted panel, with the raw edge of the binding 2.5 cm from the edge of the panel, right sides together. Stitch along the fold line, making tucks to turn the corners.

Turn the binding over to the outside of the quilted panel and slip stitch in place by hand or machine just inside the previous line of stitching. 3 Make up ties by turning in 12 mm (t in) down each long edge and then folding in half. Press and stitch, turning in the ends. Stitch the center of each tie to the appropriate point on the outside of the binding by hand. Do not make the ties too long; if they were to come untied, they could become entwined around a baby’s neck.

 POCKET STORAGE A simple fabric pocket storage system, hung on the back of the door or at the foot of the cot, can be used to store baby-changing equipment or small items of clothing. Decide on a suitable overall size for the storage system: about 60 cm wide by 100 cm deep is suitable for most needs. Plan the size and number of pockets: the instructions here are for three rows of pockets across the width of the panel, 30cm. 

Purchasing Goods with Bargain for interior designing and decoration – Tips and guidance

PRIMARY PURCHASE FOR INTERIORS AND HOW TO BARGAIN TIPS

Sometimes your interior primary purchase will logically serve as the focus of the room interior; the bed in a master bedroom is one good example in interior designing. (The bed in a guest bedroom, however, doesn’t have to be the focal point. Instead a writing desk or small sitting area may get the spotlight.) If the bed will be the most important object in your bedroom makeover, then treat it as most important like below.
 
 There, moldings and long swaths of fabric surround the bed, giving it due prominence in the interiors. Invest in a spectacular foot board and head board if you wish for the bed in interior designing. Or put your dollars toward high-quality line, an ultra-thick comforter, and armloads of plush pillows. Employ accents to draw more attention to the bed in the interior designing bedroom. Hang an impressive piece of artwork above the headboard, for example, or invest in an amazing canopy with yards of luxurious fabric draped all around the bed in the master bedroom, which you give importance in the interior designing and decoration.
 
 We employs a sea hell-inspired bed to create a fabulous focal point for the room.  We makes it and it-foot-long sofa-swathed in yards of pink python. Print vinyl-the star of the room.
 

 ACCENTS in interior designing and decoration 

 It’s easy to think of accents and accessories as the jewelry you might use to dress up a simple black dress. Arrange a few decorative boxes, a vase, and some books on a console table, and you’ve added enough detail to take the look beyond ordinary in the interior designing and decoration. If you’re a collector, however, the small things may be the most important items in your bed room of the interior. In an office in Vegas: Smoke-Mont Court, below right, We put the focus on a musician’s instruments by placing them in prominent locations-even hanging a guitar on the wall and shining a spotlight on it to make the interior designing focus on the music.
 
In interior designing and decoration, You may decide to keep your backgrounds subtle and spend your dollars on a primary purchase designed to showcase your collections. For example, purchase plenty of shelves or a handsome display cabinet with well-planned lighting to show off your treasures as a focal point in interior designing and decoration. You’ll find two great examples of accents in action in this book: Doors and doorknobs become the theme of a great- room.
 Now see if you’re able to spot whether the background, the primary purchase, or the accents are the main focus in the room of the interior designed. Interior designing has some principles and rules to fulfill to make it perfect and unique.
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We give below our designing products and services in interior designing and decoration for residential and commercial interiors. We do interior designing for automobile showrooms and hospitals, schools and restaurants, auditoriums and stadiums. 
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